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Seminars...

2014 Schedule              


April 12-13: Pattern Inlay and Decorative Borders,with Steve Latta. When most folks think of inlay, what comes to mind is period American or English furniture with a standard catalog of equally traditional designs. In this class, this age old form of ornamentation will gain firm footing in the twenty-first century. Pattern inlay involves creating designs executed with modern tooling combined with traditional materials. Through the use of simple and sometimes complex patterns, contemporary line work designs can be set into the wood. Floral patterns, animal forms, geometric or random designs are a few of the applications we'll look at. Inlaid borders, also made with a pattern, will be mentioned as well. We'll spend time gaining an understanding of the basic materials and techniques and then see where our imaginations take us. Participants should bring two or three walnut or mahogany slabs, 3/4" x 15 x 24, as well as an assortment of smaller scraps, to experiment with. There will be an additional fee for inlay materials and tooling provided by the instructor (about $40. Spend some time with Steve and you will definitely walk away with lots of new insights and techniques. He has authored many articles in numerous publications and always brings new info to his classes. Steve has been teaching at the Thaddeus Stevens School of Technology for many years now and continues to touch many woodworkers lives and interests. 9am -5pm. $350.00.

May 3-4: Carve a Philadelpha Ball and Claw foot on a Cabriole Leg, with Bess Naylor. Excellent class for beginners. 9am-5pm. Bess will demonstrate a very logical and repeatable technique to shape a cabriole leg and to carve the ball and claw foot so visually and distinctively Philadelphia. Students then carve their own leg to keep. You may also wish to purchase our booklet on how to carve these feet. 9am-5pm. $350.00, plus a materials fee unless you provide your own billet.

Philadelphia Tea Table

May 17-18: Build a Philadelphia Square Tea Table, Part I, with Bess Naylor. c1770, Philadelphia. 29.1/2" x 25.3/4" x 17.1/2". The book, "Philadelphia - Three Centuries of American Art" published by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1976, describes this table so well with the following. "Small and elegant in scale and detail,this table represents the best of Philadelphia's furniture-making enterprise. It stands well, but lightly, on its claw and ball feet,and its long attenuated legs flow into the flared apron with no visual interruption. Rhythums of carved foliage repeat the freedom achieved by the scrolls framing the edge of the skirt, and although there is a center of interest - a ruffled scroll - the effect is smooth, light, and intriguing. Flowers at the corners effectively soften the transition between the carved frame and the plain tray pedistal. ... The flared apron,its most conspicuous ornament, is carved with scrolls set against a punchwork background, unusual in Philadelphia carving." What a masterpiece!! Bess will lead three of the four classes and Chris Storb will teach Part III which focuses on the carving. Part I is $350.00. Students provide their own tools and materials. 9am-5pm each day.

June 7-8: Build an Adult's and a Child's Delaware Valley Slat Back Arm Chair, Part I, with Bess J. Naylor. These chairs have long held high interest in the antiques/collectables world. Benno Forman in "Arts of the Pennsylvanis Germans" by Scott Swank, Winterthur Museum, says, "Unquestionably the most far-reaching and totally accomodated form of furniture introduced into colonial America by German craftsmen is the arched-top, slat-back, rush-bottom chair. "This chair, probably from the Soloman Fussel shop in Philadelphia, demonstrates all the great attributes of Delaware Valley chair construction. Turned and tapered rear stiles, double-cut arms, bold arches on the upper and lower portions of the slats, "crookd foot" leg construction (early cabriole leg), tripartite front stretcher (a slight alteration from the original), cased seat and a hand twisted/hand woven rush seat. Though I have been unsuccessful at finding a photo of a child's version of this striking arm chair, I knew I had to build one for myself and am offering that information in class to any who are as fascinated by it as I am. It is sweet!! Pictures should soon follow. Students will learn the steambending process to make the slats and to form the "crook feet" as well. Advance notice should be given to the turner if you do not plan to turn your own pieces. Pricing for that service is contracted with him. Class cost $350.00. Students provide tools and materials. 9am to 5pm both days. Photo courtesy of Winterthur Museum.

Philadelphia Tea Table

July 26-27: Build a Philadelphia Square Tea Table, Part II, with Bess J. Naylor. c1770, Philadelphia. 29.1/2" x 25.3/4" x 17.1/2". The book, "Philadelphia - Three Centuries of American Art" published by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1976, describes this table so well with the following. "Small and elegant in scale and detail,this table represents the best of Philadelphia's furniture-making enterprise. It stands well, but lightly, on its claw and ball feet,and its long attenuated legs flow into the flared apron with no visual interruption. Rhythums of carved foliage repeat the freedom achieved by the scrolls framing the edge of the skirt, and although there is a center of interest - a ruffled scroll - the effect is smooth, light, and intriguing. Flowers at the corners effectively soften the transition between the carved frame and the plain tray pedistal. ... The flared apron,its most conspicuous ornament, is carved with scrolls set against a punchwork background, unusual in Philadelphia carving." What a masterpiece!! Bess will lead three of the four classes and Chris Storb will teach Part III which focuses on the carving. Part II is $350.00. Students provide their own tools and materials. 9am-5pm each day.

August 23-24: Chair II, with Bess Naylor. These chairs have long held high interest in the antiques/collectables world. Benno Forman in "Arts of the Pennsylvanis Germans" by Scott Swank, Winterthur Museum, says, "Unquestionably the most far-reaching and totally accomodated form of furniture introduced into colonial America by German craftsmen is the arched-top, slat-back, rush-bottom chair. "This chair, probably from the Soloman Fussel shop in Philadelphia, demonstrates all the great attributes of Delaware Valley chair construction. Turned and tapered rear stiles, double-cut arms, bold arches on the upper and lower portions of the slats, "crookd foot" leg construction (early cabriole leg), tripartite front stretcher (a slight alteration from the original), cased seat and a hand twisted/hand woven rush seat. Though I have been unsuccessful at finding a photo of a child's version of this striking arm chair, I knew I had to build one for myself and am offering that information in class to any who are as fascinated by it as I am. It is sweet!! Pictures should soon follow. Students will learn the steambending process to make the slats and to form the "crook feet" as well. Advance notice should be given to the turner if you do not plan to turn your own pieces. Pricing for that service is contracted with him. Class cost $350.00. Students provide tools and materials. 9am to 5pm both days. Photo courtesy of Winterthur Museum.

September 6-7: Line and Berry Techniques, with Steve Latta, Line-and-Berry descended from the Welsh tradition of vine-and-berry inlay that came to southeastern Pennsylvania in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries as William Penn opened up his lands for settlement. Used mainly on chests-of-drawers and valuables chests (spice boxes as they are often called), the style consists of straight lines and arcs of holly arranged in geometric patterns and typically set into a walnut background. The techniques we will be discussing, although specific to the spice box project, are applicable to a wide range of inlay styles ranging from the federal period to contemporary designs. In this workshop, we will cover materials, design and the necessary tooling and tool making to execute these techniques. A beautiful historic ornmentation technique! Steve worked with Lie-Neilsen to develop that line of tools and DVDs for the Line and Berry Techniques. Materials fee to instructor. Certain tools and materials may be required extra. 9am-5pm. $350.00.

Philadelphia Tea Table

September 20-21: Build a Philadelphia Square Tea Table, Part III, with Master Carve Chris Storb. c1770, Philadelphia. 29.1/2" x 25.3/4" x 17.1/2". The book, "Philadelphia - Three Centuries of American Art" published by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1976, describes this table so well with the following. "Small and elegant in scale and detail,this table represents the best of Philadelphia's furniture-making enterprise. It stands well, but lightly, on its claw and ball feet,and its long attenuated legs flow into the flared apron with no visual interruption. Rhythums of carved foliage repeat the freedom achieved by the scrolls framing the edge of the skirt, and although there is a center of interest - a ruffled scroll - the effect is smooth, light, and intriguing. Flowers at the corners effectively soften the transition between the carved frame and the plain tray pedistal. ... The flared apron,its most conspicuous ornament, is carved with scrolls set against a punchwork background, unusual in Philadelphia carving." What a masterpiece!! Bess will lead three of the four classes and Chris Storb will teach Part III which focuses on the carving. Students provide their own tools and materials. 9am-5pm each day. Chris is a nationally recognized authority of eighteenth century American furniture. He has been working as a restorer and conservator of furniture and woodwork for dealers, private collectors, and major museums for over thirty years. Most recently he completed the restoration of the carved chimneypiece and the recreation of the missing frieze applique' in the drawing room of Mount Pleasant, a historic house museum in East Fairmount Park, Philadelphia built in 1765. This is a great opportunity to expand your 18th c carving techniques, from one of the most experienced period carvers of our time. Chris is a go-to expert regarding period furniture and we are again thrilled he has agreed to return to share more of that extensive knowledge with us in a workshop setting. And what a project!! Class cost is $450.00.

October 4-6: Make Several Molding Planes,with Tod Herrli. Join well known wood worker and accomplished plane maker Tod Herrli as he returns to Olde Mill for this 3-day class that will focus on the student making two planes in 3 days. Students will be able to choose many different profiles such as: Ovolos, thumbnails, ogees, matching pair hollow and round, draw bottom, pair of smoothers (high and low angle), one ??sash plane (ask Bess about this one!). If Students have a special profile they?d like to make, the profile must be reviewed and approved prior to class by Tod. Tod has worked with Roy Underhill of the Woodwright?s shop, Scott Phillips of the American woodshop, and has taught classes at the Marc Adams School of Woodworking, Tillers international, Don Williams and John Wilson of Shaker box legend. He has also assisted Mike Dunbar of Windsor chair fame by making 3 custom planes Mike used in producing a china hutch featured in Fine Wood Working issue #165 and has written for Popular Woodworking magazine. Tod also has a second video on making ogee planes produced by Popular Woodworking set to be released March 7th, 2014. This is a class not to be missed by any serious wood worker. Material fee $45.00. Class fee $525.00. 9am to 5pm each day. See Tod's web page at www.todherrli.com

October 18-19: Build a Chair, Part III, with Bess Naylor. These chairs have long held high interest in the antiques/collectables world. Benno Forman in "Arts of the Pennsylvanis Germans" by Scott Swank,Winterthur Museum, says, "Unquestionably the most far-reaching and totally accomodated form of furniture introduced into colonial America by German craftsmen is the arched-top, slat-back, rush-bottom chair. "This chair, probably from the Soloman Fussel shop in Philadelphia, demonstrates all the great attributes of Delaware Valley chair construction. Turned and tapered rear stiles, double-cut arms, bold arches on the upper and lower portions of the slats, "crookd foot" leg construction (early cabriole leg), tripartite front stretcher (a slight alteration from the original), cased seat and a hand twisted/hand woven rush seat. Though I have been unsuccessful at finding a photo of a child's version of this striking arm chair, I knew I had to build one for myself and am offering that information in class to any who are as fascinated by it as I am. It is sweet!! Pictures should soon follow. Students will learn the steambending process to make the slats and to form the "crook feet" as well. Advance notice should be given to the turner if you do not plan to turn your own pieces. Pricing for that service is contracted with him. Class cost $350.00. Students provide tools and materials. 9am to 5pm both days. Photo courtesy of Winterthur Museum.

October 25-26: Build a Small Walnut Box, with Bess Naylor. This class is great for beginners or if you just want to expore what 18th century furniture construction is all about. Build a small box based on an original built c 1725-1775 in the Chester County, Pennyslvania area. It is approx 7.1/2" high by 8.1/5 " deep by 15.3/8" long.It has a snipe hinged lid, some applied moldings, small "turnip-shaped" feet, and dovetailed construction. You will learn all these techniques in the 18th century style. The original box has beautiful Line and Berry Decoration on it. You can learn that technique and apply it to your box outside of class. (You can also take the Steve Latta Line and Berry Techniques class offered at Olde Mill this year to learn this fantastic and creative period ormamentation!)Class cost is $350.00. Students provide their own tools and materials. 9am to 5pm. Photo courtesy of Winterthur Musuem.

Philadelphia Tea Table

November 1-2: Build a Philadelphia Square Tea Table Part IV, with Bess J. Naylor. c1770, Philadelphia. 29.1/2" x 25.3/4" x 17.1/2". The book, "Philadelphia - Three Centuries of American Art" published by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1976, describes this table so well with the following. "Small and elegant in scale and detail,this table represents the best of Philadelphia's furniture-making enterprise. It stands well, but lightly, on its claw and ball feet,and its long attenuated legs flow into the flared apron with no visual interruption. Rhythums of carved foliage repeat the freedom achieved by the scrolls framing the edge of the skirt, and although there is a center of interest - a ruffled scroll - the effect is smooth, light, and intriguing. Flowers at the corners effectively soften the transition between the carved frame and the plain tray pedistal. ... The flared apron,its most conspicuous ornament, is carved with scrolls set against a punchwork background, unusual in Philadelphia carving." What a masterpiece!! Part IV is $350.00. Students provide their own tools and materials. 9am-5pm each day.

November 15-16: Rural Inlay Techniques, with Steve Latta. During the Federal Period, there were sharp contrasts between the inlay executed in the major urban centers and the less populated rural regions. Without access to specialists, country cabinetmakers relied on innovation and developed designs inspired by simple tooling combined with lively imaginations. In my mind, some of this work is the best of our ancestors showing their flair for creativity. In this workshop, we will study and learn the techniques of these early masters as we reproduce a pair of rural New England table legs. Materials fee extra. 9am -5pm. $350.00.

Seminar Registration, Please read carefully!

Seminar Policy:
Thank you for your interest in attending a woodworking seminar with us at Olde Mill. It should be an exciting and rewarding learning experience. The following is Olde Mill's Seminar Attendance Policy. In order to register for a class, you must pay a minimum deposit of $75.00 per person, per session. Full payment is due 4 weeks in advance of the class.There will be no exceptions. Your full payment will ensure that a space will be held for you in the class. Please comply with our policy or you may lose your spot in the class.

Single Session Seminars:
In the event that you cancel attendance to a single session seminar, you will be refunded ONLY if we are contacted in writing a minimum of four weeks prior to the course. This may be done by written US Mail or an email to Bess's email address that is confirmed back to you by email. If you do not provide us with proper notification, you will not be refunded your money. Our cancellation of a class will result in a complete refund. If you cancel attendence to a class for any reason, without following the above-stated policy, you are still expected to make full payment.

Multi-Session Seminars:
Due to the nature of on-going instruction with a more complex piece, we cannot fill a vacant bench space after a project has been started. If you cancel out of a class 60 days prior to the first session, then we will refund monies paid minus a $75.00 cancellation fee. If you cancel out of a class after the first session has been held, full payment is expected for all remaining classes of that project. Our cancellation of a class will result in a complete refund.

Strict adherence to this policy will be enforced for the mutual benefit of all involved. If you have any questions about this policy, please do not hesitate to call us. We greatly appreciate your cooperation.

Email seminar questions to Bess: sales@oldemill.com












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